Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

June 27, 2016

Keeping Earth. Three years ago we introduced a cloud-free mosaic of the world in Google Earth. Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Columbia Glacier, Alaska To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Detroit, Michigan  To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Swiss Alps, Switzerland   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.  More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. Keeping Earth thumb

Higher Quality Imagery We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s more than 700 trillion individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth thumb

Landsat 8, which launched into orbit in 2013, is the newest sensor in the USGS/NASA Landsat Program—superior to its predecessors in many ways. Landsat 8 captures images with greater detail, truer colors, and at an unprecedented frequency—capturing twice as many images as Landsat 7 does every day. This new rendition of Earth uses the most recent data available — mostly from Landsat 8 — making it our freshest global mosaic to date. Keeping Earth Screen Shot atIn the new view of New York City, details like skyscrapers, building shadows, and baseball and softball fields in Central Park shine through.   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth Screen Shot atToday we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Keeping Earth Screen Shot atJuly 9, 2000  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from.  Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.

September 20, 2003

Processing imagery with Earth Engine. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images. And took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. 

 

 To produce this new imagery. We used the same publicly available. Earth Engine APIs that scientists use to do things like track global tree cover, loss, and gain; predict Malaria outbreaks; and map global surface water over a 30 year period.

Like our previous mosaic. We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.

Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

Brasilia, Brazil More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Open data is good for everyone To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe.

Landsat program and its commitment to free and accessible open data. Landsat, a joint program of the USGS and NASA. Has observed the Earth continuously from 1972 to the present day. And offers a wealth of information on the changes to the Earth’s surface over time. And it’s all available in Earth Engine!

 

The new imagery is now available across all our mapping products. To check it out, open up Google Earth, or turn on the satellite layer in Google Maps. Keeping Earth.

Post authored by: Chris Herwig, Program Manager, Google Earth Engine. Keeping Earth earthtopomaps.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

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Keeping Earth up to date and looking great was originally published on Earthtopomaps

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Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa

Google Maps Everest Growing up in the shadow of Everest

 Date Google Maps Everest March 12, 2015 google maps everest Screen Shot at

Fantastic Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009, Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational and economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle, embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps. -Ed.
I was born in 1960 in Thame, a small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak. Google Maps Everest Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30, a dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter. Google Maps Everest
google maps everest image
Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation earthtopomaps.com


Our region is famous for being home to Everest, but it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year, I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse. Google Maps Everest
google maps everest Screen Shot at


Partnering with Google Maps Google Maps Everest allowed us to get important local landmarks on the map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world, including local monasteries, lodges, schools and more, with some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online, they’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there.
google maps everest Screen Shot at


google maps everest thame before
google maps everest thame after
Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]

earthtopomaps.com

When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest, I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better, safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering.
Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person, come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa

March 12, 2015

Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009. Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational. And economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle. Embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps Everest. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps Everest. -Ed. earthtopomaps.com
I was born in 1960 in Thame. A small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest. The world’s tallest peak. Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30. A dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter.
Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation


Our region is famous for being home to Everest. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year. I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse.
Phortse Thakiri Chholing Gomba, Monastery, Nepal In my hometown to give children other options for their future. So they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. earthtopomaps.com


Partnering with Google Maps allowed us to get important local landmarks on . The map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world. Including local monasteries, lodgesschools and more. With some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online. They’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.
Phortse, Khumbu Region, Nepal The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.


 When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. earthtopomaps.com
Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]


When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better. Safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering. Through the Apa Sherpa Foundation, I now work to improve educational access by funding the Lower Secondary School. In my hometown to give children other options for their future, so they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.
The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps Everest. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person. Come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.  But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa earthtopomaps.com                                                                                                                                                       

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Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Google Earth Blog Earth Topo Maps Overlay

google earth blog CrystalSerenityLivornoGoogle Earth Blog http://www.gearthblog.com The amazing things about Google Earth Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:59:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.150387158. http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/the-jiangsu-tornado.html. http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/the-jiangsu-tornado.html#respond Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:59:17 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18681 Although Google has neglected to update ‘historical imagery’ in Google Earth since early June, they have been adding fresh imagery, and when it is reasonably good quality, it goes into the default layer and we can see it. One such instance is a region in Jiangsu Province, China which was struck by a deadly tornado […]. google earth blog NorwegianPearlMiami

The post The Jiangsu tornado appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

1]]> Although Google has neglected to update ‘historical imagery’ in Google Earth since early June, they have been adding fresh imagery, and when it is reasonably good quality, it goes into the default layer and we can see it. According to Wikipedia, the tornado killed at least 99 people and injured 846 others (152 critically).

We found a number of articles showing various photos of the destruction, such as here, here, here and here. But. actually locating the event proved more difficult. We first mapped out the area that had new imagery and started searching through it for signs of damaged buildings, but with an area of nearly 4,000 square kilometres we were not successful. We did find a raised railway under construction. google earth blog NorwegianPearlSeattle And a long trail of destroyed houses that turned out to be planned road construction. The articles either mention major nearby cities or small villages that aren’t marked on the map and couldn’t be found through search. Eventually we found mention of “Danping Village of Chenliang Township” and we were able to find Chenliang. From there, the path of destruction was easy to trace over a distance of around 30 km.

To see the path of the tornado in Google Earth download this KML file.

2

The post Malaysia and Tunisia get 3D appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

]]> Malaysia and Tunisia have recently received their first 3D imagery. Tunis and Sfax in Tunisia and Sungai Petani in Malaysia.But in some cases it is important to get it right. We had a problem with this in the past when we created a script to draw arcs. If we used absolute altitudes the ends of the arcs ended up all at a fixed altitude instead of ground level.

google-earth-blog-hoteldulac

google-earth-blog-hoteldulac

So, to show off the 3D imagery available for US Parks. Including both the new releases and areas that already had 3D (which we looked at last October).

google earth blog HotelduLac

The interesting upside down triangle architecture of the Hôtel du Lac, Tunis.

google-earth-blog-sungaipetani

google-earth-blog-sungaipetani

google earth blog SungaiPetani

Constructions sites are the easiest way to work out the date of 3D imagery. This construction site in Sungai Petani. Malaysia. tells us the 3D imagery was captured since the most recent satellite image from January 2016.

As we have previously mentioned Google appears to be slowing down in terms of new area covered by 3D. However, they are doing a significant amount of updates of existing areas.

google-earth-blog-3dprogresschart

google-earth-blog-3dprogresschart

google earth blog DProgressChart

Note that a few of the most recent finds for this month are not included in the above chart, as we have not yet finished drawing the outlines.

To see the full coverage of 3D imagery in Google Earth and find out what other recent additions there are, download this KML file.

google-earth-blog-york-minster

google-earth-blog-york-minster

Google Earth Blog There are sites such as MarineTraffic for ships and FlightRadar24 for aircraft that let you see real-time data for a significant proportion of the world’s shipping and aircraft. But if you want any historical data it has to be paid for. We have long wanted to get hold of some historical tracks so we can write algorithms to find ships and aircraft in historical imagery. But we have not managed to find any source that provides such tracks free of charge.

google earth blog York Minster

York Minster in York, England.

The post Malaysia and Tunisia get 3D appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

3]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/malaysia-tunisia-get-3d.html/feed 4 18660http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html#respond Mon, 19 Sep 2016 10:52:46 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18644 Although it is not directly related to Google Earth, Global Fishing Watch does use geographic ‘big data’. So we thought it would be worth covering. Global Fishing Watch is a partnership between Google, Oceana and SkyTruth, which aims to track the world’s fishing fleets and monitor where they fish. This will help to identify illegal […]

The post Global Fishing Watch appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

4]]> Although it is not directly related to Google Earth, Global Fishing Watch does use geographic ‘big data’. So we thought it would be worth covering. Global Fishing Watch is a partnership between Google, Oceana and SkyTruth, which aims to track the world’s fishing fleets and monitor where they fish. This will help to identify illegal fishing as well as assist in the management of fisheries. Read more about it on Google’s Lat Long blog.

To use it, start here. It requires you to sign up to use it, but the signup process is fast and free. We believe the signup is required because of the sensitivity of the data. And they require you to acknowledge that you realise the data may be inaccurate, among other things. Learn what you can do and how to use it from the tutorial here.

They do not provide an API nor any way to export data to Google Earth. The data can be accessed by their research partners via Google Earth Engine. They state, however, that the underlying ship tracking data is a commercial data-set, so they cannot distribute it freely. We really wish that shipping data and aircraft data could be made available freely, but Global Fishing Watch states that it downloads 20 million data points per day, so whoever is managing the data collection must have significant costs.

google-earth-blog-globalfishingwatch1

google-earth-blog-globalfishingwatch1

Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem.

google earth blog GlobalFishingWatch

We came across this interesting track that follows lines of longitude (every four degrees). And then another ship takes over and continues the pattern further west. Was it doing some research as well as fishing?

The post Global Fishing Watch appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

5]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html/feed 0 18644 http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html#comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 12:47:18 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18629 We have long had a fascination with cruise ships in Google Earth. Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem. Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, […]

6]]> We have long had a fascination with cruise ships in Google Earth. Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem.

Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, but never got around to completing it. In some cases, the name of the vessel can be seen in the imagery, but at other times, identifying it requires a bit of detective work. Yesterday, GEB reader Frank (not Frank Taylor), who also contributes outlines for our 3D imagery KML, sent us a collection of placemarks for cruise ships and ferries in 3D, which was much more comprehensive than ours. So, we have combined it with our collection and are providing it here in case our readers are interested.

Grab the collection here. We have implemented it as a network link and may update it over time, but do not guarantee that we will have time to do a lot of regular maintenance.

We found that a few of the placemarks we had created in the past no-longer have cruise ships at those locations. Also interesting is that some of the cruise ships in the imagery have since been sold and renamed or in some cases, such as the Sky Wonder, have since been scrapped.

A number of cruise ships appear more than once in the 3D imagery. For example:

google-earth-blog-norwegianpearlseattle

google-earth-blog-norwegianpearlseattle

Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, but never got around to completing it. In some cases, the name of the vessel can be seen in the imagery, but at other times, identifying it requires a bit of detective work. Yesterday, GEB reader Frank (not Frank Taylor), who also contributes outlines for our 3D imagery KML, sent us a collection of placemarks for cruise ships and ferries in 3D, which was much more comprehensive than ours. So, we have combined it with our collection and are providing it here in case our readers are interested.

google earth blog NorwegianPearlSeattle

Norwegian Pearl, in Seattle (west coast of the US).

The post Cloudy places are hard to photograph from space appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

10]]> In yesterday’s post we talked about Landsat imagery and how in some locations there are only a few cloud-free images per year. That was not entirely accurate, as there are some places where it is practically impossible to find a cloud-free Landsat image.

We were recently exploring the north-western area of Colombia (looking for circular islands). And noticed that the imagery there is of particularly poor quality. Most of Choco Province, Colombia, has no high resolution satellite imagery and instead uses the global mosaic. created from Landsat imagery. To make the global mosaic, Google took Landsat imagery captured over multiple years and searched for cloud-free pixels to use in the final mosaic. However, when we looked at the region with our Landsat animations KML. we found 49 images captured over the last three years. But they all had significant cloud cover.

google-earth-blog-abstractart

google-earth-blog-abstractart

google earth blog AbstractArt

Some areas look like abstract art. Another place with a similar problem – year round cloud cover – is the rainforest belt of Central Africa. In some places, Google has had to use Landsat 7 imagery, which we can see because of its characteristic stripes due to a faulty component on the Landsat 7 satellite.

google-earth-blog-riverknot

google-earth-blog-riverknot

3D imagery is above the default terrain, so intuitively one would expect relative altitudes to move upwards when you turn on.

google earth blog riverknot

We are not sure whether the above effect is due to just cloud cover. Seasonal changes in the water levels or the fact that the water colour changes over the seasons.

For an understanding of which parts of the globe have the most cloud cover, see this animation from NASA. Note that it is not images of clouds. But rather maps of the average amount of cloud cover over a month. We could not find a version for longer periods to find out which locations have near-permanent cloud cover.

Another place with a similar problem – year round cloud cover – is the rainforest belt of Central Africa. In some places, Google has had to use Landsat 7 imagery, which we can see because of its characteristic stripes due to a faulty component on the Landsat 7 satellite.

google-earth-blog-landsatstripes

google-earth-blog-landsatstripes

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point.

google earth blog LandsatStripes

Landsat 7 stripes.

The post Cloudy places are hard to photograph from space appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

11]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/cloudy-places-hard-photograph-space.html/feed 0 18603http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html#comments Tue. 13 Sep 2016 11:20:45 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18587 We recently came across this interesting article by National Geographic about a recent study of land/water changes over the last 30 years. The study is by researchers at the Deltares Research Institute, who used Google Earth Engine to gather and process the data. The data itself comes from Landsat imagery. Sadly, we were not able […] google earth blog NorwegianPearlMiami

The post Land lost vs. land gained appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

12]]> We recently came across this interesting article by National Geographic about a recent study of land/water changes over the last 30 years. The study is by researchers at the Deltares Research Institute, who used Google Earth Engine to gather and process the data. The data itself comes from Landsat imagery.

Sadly, we were not able to figure out a way to view the data in Google Earth. Was notable for being able to easily display maps in Google Earth. This is a pity, because we find Google Earth a much better platform for exploring this kind of data.

Nature Climate Change,. However, the data itself is published as a publicly available 2D map.

Most inland water bodies are quite seasonal, so we wonder how the researchers corrected for that. The Landsat imagery typically covers each spot on earth once every 16 days. This often means only a few good images per year. For the global mosaic used in Google Earth, many different images over multiple years are combined together to get the cloud-free image. But can vary considerably from year to year (more on this in a future post) This doesn’t apply to coastal land reclamation, which tends to be permanent.

google-earth-blog-koreareclaimedland

google-earth-blog-koreareclaimedland

The difference between relative altitudes and absolute altitudes is not always obvious. But in some cases it is important to get it right. We had a problem with this in the past when we created a script to draw arcs. If we used absolute altitudes the ends of the arcs ended up all at a fixed altitude instead of ground level. The eventual solution that we came up with was to use absolute altitudes and read the end point altitudes from Google’s Elevation API.

google earth blog KoreaReclaimedLand

Land reclamation near Seoul, South Korea, as seen in Aqua Monitor.

We have previously created animations of land reclamation and artificial islands being built. But we restricted ourselves to the time-frame visible in Google Earth historical imagery. Rather than the 30 years used in the above study. google earth blog riverknot

The post Land lost vs. land gained appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

13]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html/feed 1 18587http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.htmlhttp://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.html#respond Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:27:40 +0000http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18571 We have done a number of posts in past years covering various aspects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent rebuilding of the World Trade Center, so today we will only be looking at some of the most recent changes. If you go to the site of the World Trade Center in Google Earth, […]

The post Remembering 9/11 with Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

14]]> We have done a number of posts in past years covering various aspects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent rebuilding of the World Trade Center, so today we will only be looking at some of the most recent changes.

If you go to the site of the World Trade Center in Google Earth, and turn off the 3D buildings layer.

2016. and shows 3 World Trade Center nearing completion. According to Wikipedia, the concrete core is now at its maximum height. We previously created a Street View slideshow showing the changes that have taken place over the years. We have updated it with the most recent imagery below.

google-earth-blog-wtc1

google-earth-blog-wtc1

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point. Oddly enough, this contradicts what it says on this page. Which states that Google Earth uses absolute altitudes for tours precisely because of the problems we are experiencing.

google earth blog WTC

Speed in milliseconds per image: World Trade Center 2 in the corner opposite the pools. And World Trade Center 5 on an adjacent block. See Wikipedia for more.

The post Remembering 9/11 with Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

15]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.html/feed 0 18571http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/weird-altitude-effects-google-earth.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/weird-altitude-effects-google-earth.html#comments Fri, 09 Sep 2016 11:54:35 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18559 Yesterday we made some Google Earth tours of various US parks. We recorded the tours using Google Earth’s built in ‘Record a tour’ button on the tool bar. And then navigating with a SpaceNavigator 3D mouse. Everything seemed fine until we played back the tours and found that some of them have bumps in them […]

The post Weird altitude effects in Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog. earthtopomaps.com

16]]> Yesterday we made some Google Earth tours of various US parks. We recorded the tours using Google Earth’s built in ‘Record a tour’ button on the tool bar and then navigating with a SpaceNavigator 3D mouse. Everything seemed fine until we played back the tours and found that some of them have bumps in them and occasionally some have quite severe up and down jitter. We found that these effects were actually part of the tours as they would occur in the same place when played again.

Thus Google Earth recorded the wrong altitudes when recording the tour. And when playing it back new altitude data is available. So it looks wrong. After much investigation. We do believe that is the main cause of the problem, but that there are other issues as well. google earth blog York Minster

We thought it would be interesting to try and fix the tours by using some maths to smooth out the altitudes. However. Smoothing them out may be difficult or impossible. Google Earth can store altitudes in two basic ways: relative to the ground (or sea floor). or an absolute measurement (from sea level). A third option is to leave out the altitudes and have objects automatically clamp to the ground level.

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point. Oddly enough, this contradicts what it says on this page. Which states that Google Earth uses absolute altitudes for tours precisely because of the problems we are experiencing.

As we noted in this post. when viewing areas with 3D, Google Earth shows the altitudes from the 3D imagery in the status bar. Or whether it uses the 3D imagery where available. What we found was surprising.

Typically. 3D imagery is above the default terrain, so intuitively one would expect relative altitudes to move upwards when you turn on. 3D imagery. What happens is the opposite. They move downwards. This is because.

The two scenes below illustrate what happens. In both cases we have some lines set to a fixed height relative to the ground:

17 August month-end post we mentioned that Monument Valley, Arizona / Utah was now in 3D in Google Earth. Several other US parks also received 3D imagery at the same time. What we didn’t realise at the time was the reason why. Google added 3D for several US parks at the end of August. It was because the US National Park Service celebrated its hundredth birthday on August 25, 2016. earthtopomaps.com

So, to show off the 3D imagery available for US Parks. Including both the new releases and areas that already had 3D (which we looked at last October). We have created some Google Earth tours, which you can view in Google Earth with this KML file. We have also recorded a select few of them in the YouTube video below:

Note that we haven’t created tours for every US park that has 3D. We have included outlines for the parks we know about that have 3D. If you notice we have missed any, please let us know in the comments.

For a map of all areas, not just US parks, that have 3D use this KML file.

The post US National Parks in 3D for centenary appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

18]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/us-national-parks-in-3d-for-centenary.html/feed 3 18544 7]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html/feed 2 18629http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/worldview-4-skysat-launches.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/worldview-4-skysat-launches.html#comments Thu, 15 Sep 2016 11:14:57 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18614 The next couple of days will see two significant launches for satellite imaging.                                                       The post Ships in Google Earth’s 3D imagery appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Crystal Serenity in Livorno, Italy.

If you are interested in collections of ships visible in 2D imagery, be sure to check out the Google Earth Community transport collections.

The post Ships in Google Earth’s 3D imagery appeared first on Google Earth Blog.                                                                                                       Which have a resolution of 3-5 m per pixel. It is also better resolution than the best imagery Google Earth currently has for some locations, so we hope Google considers using Terra Bella imagery to fill in the gaps in Google Earth.

Which have a resolution of 3-5 m per pixel. It is also better resolution than the best imagery Google Earth currently has for some locations, so we hope Google considers using Terra Bella imagery to fill in the gaps in Google Earth.                                                                                                               This is not as good as WorldView-4’s 30 cm per pixel, but is better than Planet Lab’s Dove satellites.                                                                                  Norwegian Pearl, in Miami (east coast of the US). earthtopomaps.com     

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Google Earth Blog Earth Topo Maps Overlay was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Mapping Brazilian islands under the sea

Mapping Brazilian islands Trinta ReisMapping Brazilian islands, above ground and under the sea

Mapping Brazilian Islands March 17, 2015

But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection Mapping Brazilian Islands. While you won’t be able to come here as a tourist. Also known as “The Devil’s Hole.” this huge rock formation is a popular diving spot in Fernando de Noronha. Tourists, only permitted on the island in limited groups due to conservation efforts. These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming. Also known as “The Devil’s Hole.” this huge rock formation is a popular diving spot in Fernando de Noronha. But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection. A trip to Fernando de Noronha may begin with a stop at Cacimba do Padre. These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.Mapping Brazilian islands Praia da Cacimba do Padre

But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection. These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming. Mapping Brazilian Islands But now you can visit them from the comfort of your couch. Fernando de Noronha and Atol das Rocas are also sanctuaries for animals and marine wildlife precious to the regions.. These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.Mapping Brazilian islands Baia dos Porcos

A trip to Fernando de Noronha may begin with a stop at Cacimba do Padre. But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection. A trip to Fernando de Noronha may begin with a stop at Cacimba do Padre.
Mapping Brazilian islands Atol das Rocas
Also known as “The Devil’s Hole.” this huge rock formation is a popular diving spot in Fernando de Noronha. But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection.
Mapping Brazilian islands Screen Shot at
Buraco de Inferno

Fernando de Noronha and Atol das Rocas are also sanctuaries for animals and marine wildlife precious to the regions. But also deep into the ocean for Brazil’s first underwater Street View collection. g) these dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.Mapping Brazilian islands Trinta Reis

f)These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming. These dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.
Mapping Brazilian islands Canal da Sela Ginete
Dolphins Swimming through Canal da Sela Gineta

Alongside divers snapping pictures. You can swim with a large sea turtle moving with the ocean’s current. These. Dolphins. Known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.

Mapping Brazilian islands Buraco das Cabras

Posted by Deanna Yick. Street View Program Manager. This Street View journey not only takes you across golden beaches and around towering cliffs.

Google Maps’ latest Street View imagery takes you through both UNESCO World Heritage Sites. These. Dolphins, known as “spinner dolphins.” due to their acrobatic modes of swimming.

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Mapping Brazilian islands under the sea was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Topographic Map Overlay In Google Earth – Youtube

Tutorial Google Earth Visualise Field Data in and Fusion Tables

Visualise Tutorial Google Earth and Fusion Tables.

Tutorial Google Earth Open Data Kit (ODK) is a suite of tools that allows data collection using mobile devices and data submission to an online server. even without an Internet connection or mobile carrier service at the time of data collection. You can collect data remotely without an Internet connection or mobile carrier access. Gather text, numeric data. media and more with a mobile device. Then. host your data online using Google’s powerful hosting platform. Google AppEngine. and visualise your data as a map using Google Fusion Tables and Earth created by developers at the University of Washington’s Computer Science and Engineering department and members of Change. Open Data Kit is an open-source project available to all. Please visit their ODK project page for more information. recent updates, more tutorials. and to contribute to the project.

Visualise Tutorial Google Earth and Fusion Tables.

tutorials_odk_visualize1_google_earthtutorials odk visualize google earth

Visualise Tutorial Google Earth and Fusion Tables. Earth for this tutorial, we will use the data that’s been previously collected and uploaded to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com.

This data was collected in the field using Open Data Kit. The data is stored in a Fusion Table and displayed in Google Earth.

Earth

Prerequisites

  • No programming skills needed!
  • We strongly recommend that you have taken the prior tutorials, Mobile Data Collection using ODK Collect and Manage Your Data with ODK Aggregate. We also recommend taking Getting Started with Mobile Data Collection.
  • You will need a Google Account to log in to ODK Aggregate and view your data in Fusion Tables (get one here).
    1. Earth On the « List of Forms » page of http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com or your own ODK Aggregate instance. click « Create KML file ».
    2. Earth Several options will appear. For « Field to Map », select the field that corresponds to your form’s GPS location question. For « Title Field ». Select the field that you would like to appear at the top of your Google Earth pop-up balloons. For « Picture Field to Display ». Select the field that corresponds to your photo. Then click « Submit » and your Google Earth KML file will begin downloading. You can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view.
      tutorials_odk_visualize5_google_earthEarth for this tutorial, we will use the data that’s been previously collected and uploaded to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com.tutorials odk visualize
    3. Once the file has finished downloading, double click the file to open it in Earth. You should see placemarks for each data submission. If you click on a placemark to open the pop-up balloon. You should see a table with the data values for that submission.If you are using the Sample.xml form, here’s how your pop-up balloons will appear:tutorials_odk_visualize7_google_earthtutorials odk visualize google earthIn this exercise, we will use a sample form to demonstrate the most common kinds of data you can collect with Open Data Kit and and display with Google Fusion Tables and Google Earth. You can get the sample form on your mobile device by following the instructions in the previous tutorial, Manage Your Data with ODK Aggregate.

      Let’s Get Started!

      In the previous tutorials. you learned how to send your form submissions to our instance, or your own instance. of ODK Aggregate. To see the data you added to the form, go to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com and log in using your Google Account.                                                                                                                          You can choose either Google Spreadsheets or Google Fusion Tables.

      Earth for this tutorial, we will use the data that’s been previously collected and uploaded to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com. The dataset will continuously be added to as more people take this tutorial and add more data. If you upload data to this server. please note that the server has been made public so please don’t upload material you don’t want others to view. If you collected data using your own AppEngine instance in the last tutorial, feel free to follow along accordingly.

      View Your Data with Google Fusion Tables

      Earth ODK Aggregate provides an automatic link to a table that you’ve created with Google Fusion Tables. Fusion Tables allows you to upload different datasets. merge your datasets. visualise your dataset quickly and easily on a map and query your data. You can also collaborate with others on your data and set different permission levels for different users. The mapping functionality of Fusion Tables is covered in more depth in three other tutorials: Map sample data with Fusion Mapper,Map your own data with Fusion Mapper and Sharing a map from Fusion Mapper.

      1. Earth

        First, you’ll need to publish your data from ODK Aggregate to Google Fusion Tables. In the « Submissions » tab. under « Filter Submissions », select the form you wish to export. Then, hit the « Publish » button.

      2. Earth

        Select the service to which you want to create the connection. You can choose from Google Spreadsheets  an online. Collaborative spreadsheet tool; or Google Fusion Tables, a lightweight online database with built-in visualisation options. You can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view.
        tutorials_odk_visualize2_google_earthYou can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view.tutorials odk visualize

      3. Earth You can also view your data in Earth.

        You can choose either Spreadsheets or Fusion Tables. For this tutorial, select Fusion Tables.
      4. Earth

        Select one option from the drop-down menu to define what you want to upload:a. « Upload Existing Submission Data Only ». will only upload the existing data you already have submitted to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com or your own ODK Aggregate instance.
        b. « Stream New Submission Data Only » if you want new only submissions to your form to be automatically entered into Fusion Tables.
        c. « BOTH Upload Existing and Stream New Submission Data » will put your existing submissions into Fusion Tables and continue automatically adding new submissions to your table.tutorials odk visualize
      5. Earth You can also view your data in Earth.

        Choose « BOTH Upload Existing & Steam New Submission Data. »

      6. Earth

        Click « Publish ».

      7. Earth

        You must authorise ODK Aggregate to create a Fusion Table within your Google Account that you can access in the future. Click « Authorise Fusion Table Creation from Google Account ».

      8. Earth

        You will see the standard message « If you grant access, you can revoke access at any time under ‘My Account’. odk-training.appspot.com will not have access to your password or any other personal information from your Google Account. » If you wish to proceed, click « Grant Access ». The connection is created and you’ll be returned to the main List of Forms page in ODK Aggregate.
      9. Fusion Tables at http://www.google.com/fusiontables and log in to view your new table. Note: only you will be able to view your data submissions in your Fusion Tables Google account. From Fusion Tables, you can grant others various levels of access to your data (learn how).

      10. Select « Map » from the « Visualize » menu. You should see your data points displayed on a Google Map. There are errors in the data, learn how to Modify your Columns. Points aren’t displaying where you expect them to display, change the « Location » setting in the « Map » view (or visit Help).tutorials_odk_visualize4_google_earthYou can choose either Google Spreadsheets or Google Fusion Tables. You can also view your data in Earth.

        Such as points, lines and polygons to better tell the story about your data. If you are using the Sample.xml form, here is how your pop-up balloons will appear by default:tutorials_odk_visualize5_google_earthYou can choose either Google Spreadsheets or Google Fusion Tables. You can also view your data in Earth.tutorials odk visualize

      TIP: If you would like to have photos appear alongside your data submissions on the map. You can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view. You can also view your data in Earth.

      View Your Data in Earth

      You can also view your data in Earth. This is a good alternative to viewing your data in Fusion Tables. If you want to add more information to enhance your map. Such as points, lines and polygons to better tell the story about your data. You can also use GE to create a narrated tour to tell the story about the region for which you are collecting data. Earth for this tutorial, we will use the data.
    Earth for this tutorial, we will use the data that’s been previously collected and uploaded to http://odk-tutorial.appspot.com. Then. learn how to create a dynamic link from your Google Fusion Tables dataset to Earth.

    You can choose either Google Spreadsheets or Google Fusion Tables.
    tutorials odk visualize google earth

     

    Tip: Once you have imported your data into Earth, you can add additional points. lines and polygons to tell a story about your field data collection results.

    You can also use GE to create a narrated tour to tell the story about the region for which you are collecting data.

     

    You can also view your data in Earth.

     

    Discussion & Feedback

    You can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view. You can also view your data in Earth.

    What’s Next?

    • Go to related tutorials: Fusion Tables Tutorials
    • See the video tutorial page.
    • See all tutorials.

Visualise Field Data in Earth and Fusion Tables was originally published on Earth Topo Maps. earthtopomaps.com    You can do so by using the « Configure Info Window » link at the top of the « Map » view. You can also view your data in Earth.                  

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Tutorial Google Earth Visualise Field Data in and Fusion Tables was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Storytelling with maps using Tour Builder

Storytelling with cards using Tower Builder

screenshot of the homepage Tour BuilderTour Builder uses the Google Earth plugin for its 3D map. However, because some major browsers (including Chrome) is the removal or reduction in support for web plugins. Tour Builder.

Topo Maps Earth is a narrative tool web based allowing you to easily create and explore stories and places in the world. Based on Google Earth plug-in, you can create a tour of a topic of your choice. Zoom to show the places where the events took place. And easily incorporate the text of the story. Photos and videos. Tour Builder. Tour Builder.

Storytelling with cards using Tower Builder. Tour Builder adds a 2D mode using Google Maps API in May 2015 and this tutorial focuses on Tower Builder 3D mode. Most of the features available in 3D mode are available in 2D mode, unless otherwise specified. Your visit will steal users from one place to another along the story of your visit. immersing them in the appropriate places. This tutorial will introduce you to Tower Builder. will guide you through the process of creating and sharing your own circuit. Tour Builder.

through imagery and Google Earth custom content you provide. earthtopomaps.com

Before BeginOrder to complete this tutorial, you will need a text. Photo and video content to add to your visit. You can use your own text, photos and videos, or you can use the content of the sample provided by our friends at the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI). Just download the zip file below and extract the contents to a folder on your desktop.

Tour_Builder_JGI_sample_content.zip (Zip file 530k)

Storytelling with cards using Tower Builder

Preconditions Tour Builder.

Use Tower Builder and create your own business, you will need a computer with Internet access and ideally a Web browser that supports the Google Earth Plugin.

Click here for more information on the Google Earth Plugin and a list of plates – forms that currently support it. If you do not have a browser that supports the Google Earth Plugin, you can use 2D Tower Builder. Earthtopomaps.com


 


Access Tour Builder begin by pointing your browser to the address below:

http://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com

In this section we will take a look at the home page and all the things you can do with Tower Builder.

Storytelling with cards using Tower Builder

Tour Builder Home

First page you see is the Home Tour Builder page. Here you can explore the existing tours, start creating your own tour, or access visits you have created in the past. It will look like the screenshot below. Tour Builder. earthtopomaps.com

 

.comscreenshot of the homepage Tour Builder

Login

It is always a good idea to connect to Tower Builder with your Google account, and it is necessary if you want to do something more than to explore guided tours of the Gallery. To log in, click the Login button at the top right. You can sign in with a Gmail account, a Google Apps account *. Or other e – mail address you used to sign up for a Google Account and password. Once you are logged in, you will see My Tours and Tours shared buttons appear. Tour Builder.

* Note for Google Apps users, you will have the opportunity to share visits with individuals, or publicly, but you will not have the option to share a tour with only your domain. In addition, some Google Apps accounts users can see issues where the downloaded videos on Picasa are not publicly visible. If you see this problem, contact your Apps account administrator.

Tour Builder button Sign-In

Go ahead and log in now!

collaborative editing

If you want to be able to modify a tour with a team of people. We recommend that you create the tour with a shared account, everyone can connect to. But make sure that one person edits at once, or you may overwrite eachothers changes. Tour Builder.

home button earthtopomaps.com

Home button looks like a small house, is available in the top left of most pages Tower Builder. You can click the Home button to return to the home page.

my Tours

Click the My Tours button in the upper left corner of the home page. Tour Builder.

The My Tours button will take you to a list of visits you have created. On this page you can see all your visits. If it is empty, do not worry, at the end of this tutorial, you will have at least one tour you have created this page. Each visit, you get three links: Overview, Edit and Delete. Clicking Preview will show you tour as a user would see, read-only mode. Change will take you to the editing interface where you can add or change the content of your visit. Clicking Delete deletes all your tour … be careful!

My Tours button

Shared Tours button

Back to the home page and click on the Shared Tours button

Shared Tours button will take you to a list of visits that have been shared with you by other users. If nobody has shared a tour specifically with you, then this page will be blank. If there are visits here, you will be able to click on tours to view them. Tour Builder.

Shared Tours button

Gallery button Tour Builder.

Back to the home page and click on the Gallery button.  Gallery you button take you to a list of visits that were released publicly by other users. This is an ideal location to explore the fascinating tours on stories and amazing places. Take time to check some – some tours for ideas on how to create your own!

Gallery button

FAQ button

The FAQ button will take you to a page that answers frequently asked questions about Tower Builder. Including some product information, answers to technical questions. A link to provide feedback. Tour Builder.

View Tour button

Blue View Tower A button on the home page will open a selected sample tour for you to explore. See a Visit section of this tutorial will guide you through a tour and show you how to navigate, explore the map and content. Tour Builder.

View Tour buttonButton Create new tower

On the home page you will see two red buttons labeled Create new tower and create a business . Clicking one of these buttons will start the process of creating a new tour. Create a new tour this tutorial section will guide you through the creation process of a visit. Tour Builder.

Button Create new tower


See a TourThis section will guide you through Tower Builder, explain all the different parts of a tour. Give you advice on how to navigate through the content items. If you are already comfortable with viewing visits Tower Builder and you just want to create a turn, you can move to the next section: Create new tour. Tour Builder.

Start with the display of a visit, click on the logo Tour Builder top left of the window to return to the home page. If you are not already there. Tour Builder.

Open a visit

Open a visit that we can explore, or click the blue View Tower A button to open the headlining tour, or click on the Gallery button and click to view one of the tours available there – there. I’ll open the start of the tour of the Rubicon team of the gallery for examples – below. This tour tells the story of a group of Marines and how they started a relief organization in disaster. Tour Builder.

Example Tour Gallery

Tour Introduction

When you open a business, you will see the presentation Tour. On the left is a vertical list of maps of the locations of the tour. With the introduction top of the list, selected in red. Just to the right of the list is the content of the introduction of the tour, including the title, description and photos. And on the right is Google Earth, zoom to a preview of the tour. You can click on the map to pan and zoom around whenever you want. Tour Builder.

screenshot - round introduction

Take a moment to read the description and view pictures.

Places and Navigation Tour Builder.

Now that you have read the introduction, it’s time to go to the first position on the circuit. Each frame shows the next piece of history, with a specific view of the map, the text description and usually photos or videos.

There are three ways to navigate between locations on the tour, either by clicking the Back and Next buttons at the bottom of the content pane, clicking on the location map in the list of locations, or by clicking on the markers location on the map. The best way to explore is a tower usually follow the script provided by the creator of the tour, using the Next button. But we will try all options, so that you are familiar with them. Tour Builder. earthtopomaps.com

Use the Next button

To get to the first location, just click the Next button at the bottom of the content area.

next button

You should now see the first location “House of Jake” selected in red in the list of sites, and text and picture content for the first location in the content area. Earth will be enlarged to show the first position on the map. This is the home of one of the team members, and content described a little about his past. Tour Builder.

screenshot of the location of a

Select from the list of locations

Go to the following location, click on the second position in the list of locations. You should now see the second location selected in red card, board content indicating “House Will”, and the flight plan to the new location. You may have noticed there was a line on a map connecting locations. Tour Builder.

capture location screen two

Select a location on the map

Tour Builder. To get to the third, we will try using the card. Zoom out using the mouse scroll wheel, or by clicking on the command zoom on the map until you can see many location pins tour on the map. Click one of them to see that you will start zooming at this place, and will update the content to the left of you about this place. Can you find the location called “Hurricane Sandy”, which was a landmark near New York City?

screenshot of three location

Viewing photos and videos

Locations can be one or more photos and videos associated with them, and it is easy to explore!

pics

Smaller versions of the photos are displayed in the contents pane of the site. To view the larger version of a photo. Click the expand button (4 small arrows) at the bottom right of the photo. To return to the tour, simply click anywhere outside the picture, or press the Esc key on your keyboard. Tour Builder.

Display pictures

If there are multiple pictures or videos to a site, hover your mouse over the photo and you will see arrows on either side of the photo. Click these arrows to scroll through the photos and videos. This also works in the full-size view. where you can also use the arrow keys on your keyboard to scroll through photos. Tour Builder.

scroll through pictures

videos

When a video is associated with a location, you will see a red play button on the video. Click the button to expand the video and again to start playback. If there is more than one photo or video, you will see the arrows that allow you to scroll through them. Tour Builder.

video playback

Browse map

At any point in your exploration of a tour, you can stop and discover places on the map. Just zoom in further to see more detail or zoom and pan to see the surrounding areas and get a better understanding of the location and context of the places around him. Tour Builder.

navigation map controls

Asiest way to move the map. Does using your mouse to enter the area of the map and drag to pan. You can also use the four arrow keys in the on-screen controls, or the arrow keys on your keyboard to move the map. If you use your keyboard is not working. try clicking on the first card, to make it the center of your keyboard commands. Tour Builder.

You also have many options to zoom in and out. To zoom, you can double-click anywhere on the map, or double-right-click to zoom out. If you have a mouse with a scroll wheel, just click on the map and turn the scroll wheel to zoom in and out. You can also use the zoom control to the screen or page-up and page down buttons on your keyboard.

To tilt, you can use the tilt controls on the screen, but it is often faster and easier to use the keyboard by holding down the Shift key and use up and down arrows (to tilt around the center the map view). or hold down the Ctrl key and use the arrows up and down (to switch around the current point of view of the camera). Tour Builder.

You can always press the R button to return to the straight down, north-up view.

Do not hesitate to explore the map and clicking pins you find to see where they lead. Tour Builder.

If you want more information on the navigation map in Google Earth, check out these articles:

– Navigation in Google Earth (see “Using a mouse” and other sections at the bottom)

– 3D viewer navigation (for all keyboard shortcuts)

 


Now create a new tour, it’s time to create your own circuit. We will guide you through it and help you tell a short story by taking your viewers in multiple locations and adding a text description. Photos and videos. You can use the content provided by the Jane Goodall Institute to the top of this tutorial to tell a story about chimpanzees, or you can use your own content.

Starting a new tour

On almost every page Tour Builder, you should see a red Create new tower on the top right button. You can also return to the homepage by clicking the logo Tour Builder top left, and find the red create a visit button in the center of the page.

create a new tour button

Click the red Create new round button to start creating a turn.

You should see the page below to request a name for your visit, and the author’s name (which is your name or organization name). These show that the title of the tour and the pen under the title where the tour is listed. Tour Builder.

lets begin dialogue

Complete the tour name and name of the author of the fields, then click the blue Create Tour button. Do not worry about your visit is completely private until you decide to share with others.

For this tutorial. I will use a business name “Jane and the Chimps” and my pen name, “Bill Shakespeare.” Click the Create round button when ready.

Changing the Tour Presentation

Now you are in the edit page for the Presentation Tour. You will see the name and the author just enter are listed here. You can change them if you wish. earthtopomaps.com

Adding an image

Add a photo to the introduction page. We will use the photo: jane_peak.jpg from the zip file content that you downloaded in Before you begin this section – above. Tour Builder.

l'introduction add photo

Under “Select a picture Introduction,” click Add a photo . You will see the “Select a photo”. With options to choose a photo from your albums. Upload a photo, search the web for images, or select a image URL. Choose Add Photos . Tour Builder.

select a photo page

On the page. that appears, you can select an existing album or create a new one. For this tour, we’ll just use the default. Now you can drag the photo from your computer on this page, or click the blue Select photos from your computer button to go find jane_peak.jpg photo to download. Once you have downloaded the photo, and returned to the edit page tour presentation, a small version of the photo should be included. Do not worry, there will be greater in the viewer. Tour Builder.

Introduction (this is – it) Presentation box is the place where you can type a text description or introduction to your visit. This should explain that the overall tour is about. This box has basic formatting options, including bold, italic, underline, bulleted lists, indentation, and clickable links. There is also a Tx button that clears all formatting. Tour Builder.

Type some text in the description box. You can copy and paste this:

Jane Goodall is one of the naturalists and environmentalists the most famous in the world. His work revolutionized our understanding of chimpanzees. She began the Jane Goodall Institute, which works for the conservation of chimpanzees in Africa. Tour Builder.

Also try adding a link to a Web site, as the site of JGI: http://www.janegoodall.org

text box introduction

Editing options Tour-Large

On the Introduction screen, there are a number of options that affect the entire tour, including how the lines are drawn between locations and which layers are displayed on the map. The sections below will show you all of them. Tour Builder.

Type of history

Type of history determines the locations you set for your visit are connected by lines on the map. There are five options as shown below.

type of story options

  • “Story 3D” – The locations are connected in the order they appear in the list, with 3D lines that arc in the sky from one place to another on the map.
  • “History 2D” – The locations are connected in the order they appear in the list, with flat lines that stick to the surface of the earth.
  • “Hub 3D” – The locations are all connected to the first location in a star pattern, the first location as the hub, and 3D curved lines from there to each of the other locations.
  • “2D Hub” – The locations are all connected to the first location in a star pattern, the first location that the hub and the other sites that are connected by flat lines on the surface of the earth.
  • “Off” disables the lines and means that the locations will only be shown on the map pins.

Choose the default “Story 3D”.

ath_Color

The color path lets you choose the color of the lines connecting the locations of your tour on the map. Click the drop down menu to display the options, and if you want a color other than the standard yellow, go ahead and select it. Tour Builder.

way color combo

Map Style

The Map Style section lets you select base layers to be displayed on the Google Earth map. Options include Borders & Labels, roads, 3D buildings and 3D trees (only available in some locations). You can select the one you want. For this tutorial, we’ll all light except for roads. Tour Builder.

Style Selector card

Options Carte Overlay

At the bottom of the panel, you’ll see a line that says “Add a KML / KMZ file by URL”. This allows you to add a set of geographic data as an overlay for the tour. For example, if you have your own location points card, or state polygons you want to display on the map during the tour, you can add it here. There will be similar options for adding data layers for each individual site you add, but any data layer you add here in the Introduction section will be visible for the whole tour. Tour Builder.

Adding a KML overlay card requires you to have a KML file with the data you want to view. All KML or KMZ file supported by the Google Earth plug-in browser should work. You will need to upload it to a public place on the web, and paste in the URL of the file.

If you use My Maps, you must use the KML URL of your card. For this, copy the URL of your card, which looks like this: https://mapsengine.google.com/map/ change mid = ExampleMapID1234567890? … And change the “edit” to “kml”, like this : https://mapsengine.google.com/map/ kML ? mid = ExampleMapID1234567890 .

the map overlay options

Adjusting the view

For locations that you add next, you can set the map view associated with each location. For the introduction Tour, this is not an option as a Tour Builder automatically chooses for the introduction to the tour based on places that you create. Tour Builder.

Save your work

There is a Save now the top right button when you’re in Edit mode. You can click from time to time while editing, to save your work. Once you click the button, it will tell you when the tour was the last backup. Tour Builder automatically saves your work from time to time, but if you make a major change and do not want to risk losing, just click Register Now. Tour Builder.

Register Now button

If you want to see what you’ve created to date, click the Done Editing button to switch to playback mode. You can always return to editing by clicking the Edit top right button.

your visit to the introduction date


Adding sites to your TourNow the introduction of options and tours to scale are set, you are ready to add a few places to visit. If you are not in Edit mode, click the Edit button in the upper right corner.

Edit button

On the left, find the blue + Add Location button and click it to launch a new location.

add the locator button

Mark your first location

When you click the + Add Location button to start a new location, you get two options to place the point on the map. You can search for a location or manually drop a pin on the map. Tour Builder.

new form of location

Search for a Location

To search for a location, type the location in the search box, and you’ll see a list of results appear as you type. When you see the result you want, click it, or if it is at the top of the list, just press Enter to select it. The card will fly there and show the marker on the map.

add search result to visit

Try a few places to see how it works. Now, search for “Bournemouth, -. UK” When you map flys in Bournemouth, mouse over the search results and click the blue Add Tour button to add the site to the tour.

Post a Placemark

Another method to add a landmark is to place it on the map manually. To do this, you click the drop Placemark button, then click the location you want on the card, then click the blue Add to visit button. We will guide you through this for the next place. Tour Builder.

file marker on the map and add to visit

Do not worry if you do not get the point exactly correct the first time. You can always drag the marker to move and re-set the view later.

Change your location details

For each location, you can give it a name, photos and / or videos, descriptive text, and a number of other details. This section will guide you through all the options. earthtopomaps.com

Location name

Give your site a name. If you have looked for a location, the name will probably already in the Location Name box, but you can change it if you wish. For the tour we build, we will give the location in Bournemouth name: “Jane Home”. Tour Builder.

location name

Add a photo or video

Under “Improve story” is a place to add up to 25 photos and / or videos. Just as you did for the introduction, add jane_and_leakey.jpg picture there.

If you add captions to your Picasa pictures. Or you add a description to your YouTube video, those who will be translated as subtitles in Tower Builder. Tour Builder.

Photo and video interface

Start and end dates

Tour builder can display dates in just the place name. If you want to display a start date or end date, or both, you can enter here. Dates may the year only one month, day only, or any combination … all three are not necessary. The dates are optional, so we’ll leave them blank for this example.

Note that setting the start and end dates only lists the dates in the content of the site, it does not affect the imaging parameters of historical imagery (discussed below). Tour Builder.

the date of commands

Add some description text

Under “Tell the Story” is a text box, you can enter the history of this place. Like the introduction, you have basic formatting commands here.

For this tour, type or copy and paste something like this:

Growing up in Bournemouth, England, Jane Goodall was fascinated by animals, and loved to read Dr. Dolittle and the Tarzan series. In 1957, she went to Kenya and met the famous Dr. Louis Leakey who hired him as secretary. And finally helped her to start studying chimpanzees. Tour Builder.

tell the history text box

Customizing View

Now on to the map for a minute and customize the display of the map associated with this location. Using the techniques described above, go to a nice view. Let’s zoom in a bit and tilt the map to view something like the one below. Tour Builder.

zoom and tilt map, then lock this view

Once you have a view that you like, click the blue lock See this button in the top right of the map. It combines this view with your location, and when your users are going to this place, the card will go to this view.

Please note that this feature is not available in 2D mode.

Choose an icon

Back in the editing of content Location panel, under “Status Icon”, you can choose a map icon for your location. Click Change icon to display the options, and choose an icon from the available list. We will use the yellow icon to the house – it. Tour Builder.

Icon selector

historical Images

Google Earth. has historical images available in many places throughout the world. In some places, it may have one or two images available a few years back. Tour Builder. In other places there are pictures that date back to the early days of the collection of aerial images. Tour Builder. To see what is available near your location, check the Show historical images option and see that the time slider appears in the upper left corner of the map. Move the cursor on the date of your interest and look for the white marks of ticks on the scroll bar to find an available image close to that date.

Once you have set the cursor to the historical imagery you want, make – that the zoom view and angle of the map are what you want, and click the blue lock See this button the upper right of the card to lock in the view with the setting of the historical imagery. Tour Builder.

history and imaging time slider

Please note that the historical imagery feature is not available in 2D mode.

Added overlays

At the bottom of the edit panel location, there are options to Add KML / KMZ URL . This means you can add a set of geographic data superimposed on the map, and this overlay will be displayed when the user navigates to that location. Overlays defined in the introduction Tour will be shown throughout the tour, and all overlays you define for a location will be posted at this location. For this demonstration, we’ll add an overlay to another location. For more information on creating overlays, search KML and My Maps. Tour Builder.

Save your work

Visit bulider automaticallly will save, but you can still click the Save now the top right button, just to be sure.

Add a few other places.

Adds some other places so we made an interesting visit.

second Location

  1. Click the + Add Location button on the left to add a new location.
  2. Search for “Gombe National Park” in Tanzania, and when you find it, click the blue Add to visit button.
  3. Zoom out a little bit to show more of the park, and rotate and tilt the view looking from the lake to the hills of Gombe. Click the blue Lock this view in the upper right button on the card to save the view.
  4. location name change to: “Chimps Gombe”

  5. Add the first photo of chimpanzee at this location: chimps_fishing_for_termites.jpg
  6. Click the ” + ” button on the image to add another picture. Add more photos of chimpanzees gaia_and_google.jpg and gombe_researcher_observing_chimps.jpg .If you want to delete a photo, simply click on the trash-can the icon at the bottom right of the photo box to remove it.
  7. In thing “tell the story” description box, type (or copy / paste) as:

    Gombe National Park is where Jane Goodall has made much of his research, and showed that chimpanzees know how to make and use tools, like humans. His research team studied the behavior and follow the lives of Gombe chimpanzees for many decades. Tour Builder.

  8. Under Location icon, change the green tree icon icon.
  9. Click the Save now the top right button.

screenshot of the two locations and settings

third Place

  1. Click the blue + Add Location button.
  2. Gombe zoom the map path until you can see all of Central Africa.
  3. Click the drop Placemark button and drag the mouse cursor on the map. You will see a Click Drop target on the map that moves with your mouse. Click somewhere in Central Africa to drop the marker, may – be on Gabon and Congo (do not worry about the exact get anywhere near it work).
  4. Click the blue Add to visit button to add the marker to the map and start editing the details of this town.
  5. Set the Location Name: “Chimpanzee Conservation”
  6. Add a video on the site: Click Add photos and videos , select Search YouTube and search for “Jane Goodall ground to the cloud.” Click to select the first result, entitled “From the Ground to the Cloud …”, then click the blue Select button to add video to your site. If you have trouble finding the video via search, you can also add video by URL: http://youtu.be/CNXv8EEs0P8.
  7. In the “tell the story”, type (or copy / paste) something like:

    Jane Goodall Institute (JGI), works worldwide to promote conservation of chimpanzees in Africa. This map shows the approximate historical range of chimpanzee habitat, which has been reduced rapidly due to human incursion and deforestation. The video above shows how JGI uses Google mapping tools. JGI to help protect chimpanzees, learn more on their website and consider donating. earthtopomaps.com

  8. Add a link to: http://www.janegoodall.org
  9. At the bottom of the Site panel, click the GME map and in the box that appears, enter the URL to a map of chimpanzee ranges:Tour Builder

    https://mapsengine.google.com/14495543923251622067-17492176771718658968-4/kh/

  10. Click the load button to load the overlay on the map. If you want to reset the view to better show the overlay, you can move the map and click on the Lock View this button.

screenshot of the site and three parameters

Rearrange locations

You can easily change the order of your sites by dragging and card from top to bottom location in the list. Try Tour Builder dragging a location at the top of the list and get back to where it belongs.

reorganize location maps

Let’s see how it looks!

You have finished creating your first tour and adding three points to her! Click the Register Now button at the top right just to be sure.

Now click the Done Editing top right button to exit edit mode and switch to playback mode.

If you click the top Presentation card from the list on the left, you will see the list that will host your users when they start your visit.

Tour introduction and overview of the card

Now click the Next button, or the first location “Jane Home” and look at the map to fly in this location. Click the second and third locations to see Gombe and the Chimp varies across Africa. At each location, you can read the story in text, view photos and videos, and explore further into the card. For more information see the visit See section near the beginning of this tutorial.

 


Sharing a tourNow you full circle, you can start sharing with others.

Sharing with individual people

Want to share your visit only with specific people. This could be because your visit tells a story you want to share only very specific people, or if you are still in development tour and you only want a few friends or colleagues to see and provide feedback. It’s easy to share a tour with people and specific, and they will need to login with their Google account to view.

  • Make – that you’re looking to visit you want to share and you are in playback mode. Otherwise, click the Change Done on the top right button.
  • Click the blue Share the top right button to go to the Sharing Settings dialog box.
  • Settings dialog share
  • To share only a specific person, enter their email address in the “Invite people”. You can add more than one person by separating the email addresses with commas.
  • Click the blue Done button at the bottom to save your settings. This will send an e – mail to the address (es) you have entered with a link to the tour. earthtopomaps.com

Sharing more widely

When you’re ready to share your business more broadly, making it available to anyone with the link can access without the need to connect. This is useful when your visit is over and you are ready to share it on your website, blog, or social media.

  • Fashion point of view in the tour you want to share, click the blue Share the top right button.
  • In the dialog box “Sharing Settings”, look for “Who can access”, which should say “Private – Only the people listed below can access.”
  • To the right of this, click the Change … link.
  • Settings dialog share
  • Select “Anyone who has the link”
  • Click the blue Save button.
  • share visibility options
  • Copy the link at the top of the dialog box “Link to share.”
  • link to share
  • Click the blue Done button.

Now you can share this link on your site or blog, or send via email or social media. Anyone who clicks on the link will be able to access and view your visit and explore your story!

Share on Google Plus. earthtopomaps.com

Click on the Google Plus button to share a link to your tour with your circles Google Plus or followers.

share with google plus


After that? Tour Builder to explore further, try adding a few other sites, customizing their map views, and adding more photos and videos on your sites using the various options available. You can also play with the date settings, historical imaging parameters, and maps overlay options including KML and GME cards in your tour.

Tour Builder


Discussion & FeedbackDo you have questions about this tutorial or about Tower Builder? Want to chat with other users and experts? Visit the “Outreach to non-profit / Education” on the Google Earth forum to find answers, ask questions, and discuss with others:

Forum Google Earth – profit non-Awareness / Education

If you have comments about Tower Builder, including problems you have encountered or suggestions for the product, click on the link. Comments at the bottom of the home page Tour Builder. earthtopomaps.com

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