Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

June 27, 2016

Keeping Earth. Three years ago we introduced a cloud-free mosaic of the world in Google Earth. Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Columbia Glacier, Alaska To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Detroit, Michigan  To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Swiss Alps, Switzerland   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.  More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. Keeping Earth thumb

Higher Quality Imagery We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s more than 700 trillion individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth thumb

Landsat 8, which launched into orbit in 2013, is the newest sensor in the USGS/NASA Landsat Program—superior to its predecessors in many ways. Landsat 8 captures images with greater detail, truer colors, and at an unprecedented frequency—capturing twice as many images as Landsat 7 does every day. This new rendition of Earth uses the most recent data available — mostly from Landsat 8 — making it our freshest global mosaic to date. Keeping Earth Screen Shot atIn the new view of New York City, details like skyscrapers, building shadows, and baseball and softball fields in Central Park shine through.   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth Screen Shot atToday we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Keeping Earth Screen Shot atJuly 9, 2000  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from.  Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.

September 20, 2003

Processing imagery with Earth Engine. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images. And took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. 

 

 To produce this new imagery. We used the same publicly available. Earth Engine APIs that scientists use to do things like track global tree cover, loss, and gain; predict Malaria outbreaks; and map global surface water over a 30 year period.

Like our previous mosaic. We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.

Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

Brasilia, Brazil More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Open data is good for everyone To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe.

Landsat program and its commitment to free and accessible open data. Landsat, a joint program of the USGS and NASA. Has observed the Earth continuously from 1972 to the present day. And offers a wealth of information on the changes to the Earth’s surface over time. And it’s all available in Earth Engine!

 

The new imagery is now available across all our mapping products. To check it out, open up Google Earth, or turn on the satellite layer in Google Maps. Keeping Earth.

Post authored by: Chris Herwig, Program Manager, Google Earth Engine. Keeping Earth earthtopomaps.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

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Keeping Earth up to date and looking great was originally published on Earthtopomaps

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Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa

Google Maps Everest Growing up in the shadow of Everest

 Date Google Maps Everest March 12, 2015 google maps everest Screen Shot at

Fantastic Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009, Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational and economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle, embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps. -Ed.
I was born in 1960 in Thame, a small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak. Google Maps Everest Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30, a dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter. Google Maps Everest
google maps everest image
Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation earthtopomaps.com


Our region is famous for being home to Everest, but it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year, I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse. Google Maps Everest
google maps everest Screen Shot at


Partnering with Google Maps Google Maps Everest allowed us to get important local landmarks on the map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world, including local monasteries, lodges, schools and more, with some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online, they’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there.
google maps everest Screen Shot at


google maps everest thame before
google maps everest thame after
Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]

earthtopomaps.com

When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest, I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better, safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering.
Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person, come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa

March 12, 2015

Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009. Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational. And economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle. Embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps Everest. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps Everest. -Ed. earthtopomaps.com
I was born in 1960 in Thame. A small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest. The world’s tallest peak. Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30. A dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter.
Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation


Our region is famous for being home to Everest. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year. I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse.
Phortse Thakiri Chholing Gomba, Monastery, Nepal In my hometown to give children other options for their future. So they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. earthtopomaps.com


Partnering with Google Maps allowed us to get important local landmarks on . The map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world. Including local monasteries, lodgesschools and more. With some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online. They’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.
Phortse, Khumbu Region, Nepal The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.


 When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. earthtopomaps.com
Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]


When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better. Safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering. Through the Apa Sherpa Foundation, I now work to improve educational access by funding the Lower Secondary School. In my hometown to give children other options for their future, so they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.
The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps Everest. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person. Come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.  But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa earthtopomaps.com                                                                                                                                                       

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Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Google Earth mobile with new 3D imagery

Google Earth mobileGoogle Earth mobile Downtown Denver

Fly through Seattle and Denver with new 3D imagery on Google Earth mobile

Google Earth mobile August 9, 2012

Less than two months ago. Google Earth mobile we announced a new way to fly through full metropolitan areas in 3D with Google Earth as a step in our quest to build the most comprehensive. And accurate maps. We’ve recently expanded this new imagery to the latest iPads and iPhones. And today we’ve released new 3D imagery of Denver,Google Earth mobile Safeco Field

Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington 3D experience is possible because of advanced image processing and the use of 45-degree aerial imagery. If you don’t have the latest version of the Google Earth app for iOS or Android, be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery! 

Another great way to spend a day when visiting Seattle is walking along the shoreline. Home of many iconic Seattle landmarks. Three of my favorite spots to visit are the Pike Place. The Seattle Public Library and of course. The Space Needle. Google Earth for mobile earthtopomaps.com

Be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery!

Google Earth mobile DAM
 Downtown Seattle, Washington Washington to help you better explore and tour both cities via your iOS and Android devices. Having grown up in Colorado and visited Seattle several times. This is particularly exciting for me.

For example. The amazing Denver Art Museum, with its seemingly impossible angles. earthtopomaps.com

 3D experience is possible because of advanced image processing and the use of 45-degree aerial imagery. If you don’t have the latest version of the Google Earth app for iOS or Android. Be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery!

Denver Art Museum in Denver, Colorado. Be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery!
You can also head north to visit the Wells Fargo Center, which has inspireddebate about what shape it presents. Is it a mailbox or a cash register? My vote is for mailbox. earthtopomaps.com Google Earth mobile Seattle coastline

Wells Fargo Center (left) in downtown Denver, Colorado

3D experience is possible because of advanced image processing and the use of 45-degree aerial imagery. If you don’t have the latest version of the Google Earth app for iOS or Android. Be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery! earthtopomaps.com                                                                          Colorado and Seattle. Washington to help you better explore and tour both cities via your iOS and Android devices.Having grown up in Colorado and visited Seattle several times. This is particularly exciting for me. Now I can head on over to Safeco Field. Home of the Seattle Mariners. To revisit the diamond where I’ve watched games in the past. Google Earth for mobile Be sure to update so you can check out this spectacular new 3D imagery!

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Google Earth mobile with new 3D imagery was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Google Earth Blog Earth Topo Maps Overlay

google earth blog CrystalSerenityLivornoGoogle Earth Blog http://www.gearthblog.com The amazing things about Google Earth Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:59:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.150387158. http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/the-jiangsu-tornado.html. http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/the-jiangsu-tornado.html#respond Wed, 21 Sep 2016 09:59:17 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18681 Although Google has neglected to update ‘historical imagery’ in Google Earth since early June, they have been adding fresh imagery, and when it is reasonably good quality, it goes into the default layer and we can see it. One such instance is a region in Jiangsu Province, China which was struck by a deadly tornado […]. google earth blog NorwegianPearlMiami

The post The Jiangsu tornado appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

1]]> Although Google has neglected to update ‘historical imagery’ in Google Earth since early June, they have been adding fresh imagery, and when it is reasonably good quality, it goes into the default layer and we can see it. According to Wikipedia, the tornado killed at least 99 people and injured 846 others (152 critically).

We found a number of articles showing various photos of the destruction, such as here, here, here and here. But. actually locating the event proved more difficult. We first mapped out the area that had new imagery and started searching through it for signs of damaged buildings, but with an area of nearly 4,000 square kilometres we were not successful. We did find a raised railway under construction. google earth blog NorwegianPearlSeattle And a long trail of destroyed houses that turned out to be planned road construction. The articles either mention major nearby cities or small villages that aren’t marked on the map and couldn’t be found through search. Eventually we found mention of “Danping Village of Chenliang Township” and we were able to find Chenliang. From there, the path of destruction was easy to trace over a distance of around 30 km.

To see the path of the tornado in Google Earth download this KML file.

2

The post Malaysia and Tunisia get 3D appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

]]> Malaysia and Tunisia have recently received their first 3D imagery. Tunis and Sfax in Tunisia and Sungai Petani in Malaysia.But in some cases it is important to get it right. We had a problem with this in the past when we created a script to draw arcs. If we used absolute altitudes the ends of the arcs ended up all at a fixed altitude instead of ground level.

google-earth-blog-hoteldulac

google-earth-blog-hoteldulac

So, to show off the 3D imagery available for US Parks. Including both the new releases and areas that already had 3D (which we looked at last October).

google earth blog HotelduLac

The interesting upside down triangle architecture of the Hôtel du Lac, Tunis.

google-earth-blog-sungaipetani

google-earth-blog-sungaipetani

google earth blog SungaiPetani

Constructions sites are the easiest way to work out the date of 3D imagery. This construction site in Sungai Petani. Malaysia. tells us the 3D imagery was captured since the most recent satellite image from January 2016.

As we have previously mentioned Google appears to be slowing down in terms of new area covered by 3D. However, they are doing a significant amount of updates of existing areas.

google-earth-blog-3dprogresschart

google-earth-blog-3dprogresschart

google earth blog DProgressChart

Note that a few of the most recent finds for this month are not included in the above chart, as we have not yet finished drawing the outlines.

To see the full coverage of 3D imagery in Google Earth and find out what other recent additions there are, download this KML file.

google-earth-blog-york-minster

google-earth-blog-york-minster

Google Earth Blog There are sites such as MarineTraffic for ships and FlightRadar24 for aircraft that let you see real-time data for a significant proportion of the world’s shipping and aircraft. But if you want any historical data it has to be paid for. We have long wanted to get hold of some historical tracks so we can write algorithms to find ships and aircraft in historical imagery. But we have not managed to find any source that provides such tracks free of charge.

google earth blog York Minster

York Minster in York, England.

The post Malaysia and Tunisia get 3D appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

3]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/malaysia-tunisia-get-3d.html/feed 4 18660http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html#respond Mon, 19 Sep 2016 10:52:46 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18644 Although it is not directly related to Google Earth, Global Fishing Watch does use geographic ‘big data’. So we thought it would be worth covering. Global Fishing Watch is a partnership between Google, Oceana and SkyTruth, which aims to track the world’s fishing fleets and monitor where they fish. This will help to identify illegal […]

The post Global Fishing Watch appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

4]]> Although it is not directly related to Google Earth, Global Fishing Watch does use geographic ‘big data’. So we thought it would be worth covering. Global Fishing Watch is a partnership between Google, Oceana and SkyTruth, which aims to track the world’s fishing fleets and monitor where they fish. This will help to identify illegal fishing as well as assist in the management of fisheries. Read more about it on Google’s Lat Long blog.

To use it, start here. It requires you to sign up to use it, but the signup process is fast and free. We believe the signup is required because of the sensitivity of the data. And they require you to acknowledge that you realise the data may be inaccurate, among other things. Learn what you can do and how to use it from the tutorial here.

They do not provide an API nor any way to export data to Google Earth. The data can be accessed by their research partners via Google Earth Engine. They state, however, that the underlying ship tracking data is a commercial data-set, so they cannot distribute it freely. We really wish that shipping data and aircraft data could be made available freely, but Global Fishing Watch states that it downloads 20 million data points per day, so whoever is managing the data collection must have significant costs.

google-earth-blog-globalfishingwatch1

google-earth-blog-globalfishingwatch1

Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem.

google earth blog GlobalFishingWatch

We came across this interesting track that follows lines of longitude (every four degrees). And then another ship takes over and continues the pattern further west. Was it doing some research as well as fishing?

The post Global Fishing Watch appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

5]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/global-fishing-watch.html/feed 0 18644 http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html#comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 12:47:18 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18629 We have long had a fascination with cruise ships in Google Earth. Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem. Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, […]

6]]> We have long had a fascination with cruise ships in Google Earth. Cruise ships represent a significant amount of area and deserve to be mapped, but because they move from place to place this poses an interesting mapping problem.

Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, but never got around to completing it. In some cases, the name of the vessel can be seen in the imagery, but at other times, identifying it requires a bit of detective work. Yesterday, GEB reader Frank (not Frank Taylor), who also contributes outlines for our 3D imagery KML, sent us a collection of placemarks for cruise ships and ferries in 3D, which was much more comprehensive than ours. So, we have combined it with our collection and are providing it here in case our readers are interested.

Grab the collection here. We have implemented it as a network link and may update it over time, but do not guarantee that we will have time to do a lot of regular maintenance.

We found that a few of the placemarks we had created in the past no-longer have cruise ships at those locations. Also interesting is that some of the cruise ships in the imagery have since been sold and renamed or in some cases, such as the Sky Wonder, have since been scrapped.

A number of cruise ships appear more than once in the 3D imagery. For example:

google-earth-blog-norwegianpearlseattle

google-earth-blog-norwegianpearlseattle

Some time back we had started making a collection of placemarks for various ships in 3D, but never got around to completing it. In some cases, the name of the vessel can be seen in the imagery, but at other times, identifying it requires a bit of detective work. Yesterday, GEB reader Frank (not Frank Taylor), who also contributes outlines for our 3D imagery KML, sent us a collection of placemarks for cruise ships and ferries in 3D, which was much more comprehensive than ours. So, we have combined it with our collection and are providing it here in case our readers are interested.

google earth blog NorwegianPearlSeattle

Norwegian Pearl, in Seattle (west coast of the US).

The post Cloudy places are hard to photograph from space appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

10]]> In yesterday’s post we talked about Landsat imagery and how in some locations there are only a few cloud-free images per year. That was not entirely accurate, as there are some places where it is practically impossible to find a cloud-free Landsat image.

We were recently exploring the north-western area of Colombia (looking for circular islands). And noticed that the imagery there is of particularly poor quality. Most of Choco Province, Colombia, has no high resolution satellite imagery and instead uses the global mosaic. created from Landsat imagery. To make the global mosaic, Google took Landsat imagery captured over multiple years and searched for cloud-free pixels to use in the final mosaic. However, when we looked at the region with our Landsat animations KML. we found 49 images captured over the last three years. But they all had significant cloud cover.

google-earth-blog-abstractart

google-earth-blog-abstractart

google earth blog AbstractArt

Some areas look like abstract art. Another place with a similar problem – year round cloud cover – is the rainforest belt of Central Africa. In some places, Google has had to use Landsat 7 imagery, which we can see because of its characteristic stripes due to a faulty component on the Landsat 7 satellite.

google-earth-blog-riverknot

google-earth-blog-riverknot

3D imagery is above the default terrain, so intuitively one would expect relative altitudes to move upwards when you turn on.

google earth blog riverknot

We are not sure whether the above effect is due to just cloud cover. Seasonal changes in the water levels or the fact that the water colour changes over the seasons.

For an understanding of which parts of the globe have the most cloud cover, see this animation from NASA. Note that it is not images of clouds. But rather maps of the average amount of cloud cover over a month. We could not find a version for longer periods to find out which locations have near-permanent cloud cover.

Another place with a similar problem – year round cloud cover – is the rainforest belt of Central Africa. In some places, Google has had to use Landsat 7 imagery, which we can see because of its characteristic stripes due to a faulty component on the Landsat 7 satellite.

google-earth-blog-landsatstripes

google-earth-blog-landsatstripes

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point.

google earth blog LandsatStripes

Landsat 7 stripes.

The post Cloudy places are hard to photograph from space appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

11]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/cloudy-places-hard-photograph-space.html/feed 0 18603http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html#comments Tue. 13 Sep 2016 11:20:45 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18587 We recently came across this interesting article by National Geographic about a recent study of land/water changes over the last 30 years. The study is by researchers at the Deltares Research Institute, who used Google Earth Engine to gather and process the data. The data itself comes from Landsat imagery. Sadly, we were not able […] google earth blog NorwegianPearlMiami

The post Land lost vs. land gained appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

12]]> We recently came across this interesting article by National Geographic about a recent study of land/water changes over the last 30 years. The study is by researchers at the Deltares Research Institute, who used Google Earth Engine to gather and process the data. The data itself comes from Landsat imagery.

Sadly, we were not able to figure out a way to view the data in Google Earth. Was notable for being able to easily display maps in Google Earth. This is a pity, because we find Google Earth a much better platform for exploring this kind of data.

Nature Climate Change,. However, the data itself is published as a publicly available 2D map.

Most inland water bodies are quite seasonal, so we wonder how the researchers corrected for that. The Landsat imagery typically covers each spot on earth once every 16 days. This often means only a few good images per year. For the global mosaic used in Google Earth, many different images over multiple years are combined together to get the cloud-free image. But can vary considerably from year to year (more on this in a future post) This doesn’t apply to coastal land reclamation, which tends to be permanent.

google-earth-blog-koreareclaimedland

google-earth-blog-koreareclaimedland

The difference between relative altitudes and absolute altitudes is not always obvious. But in some cases it is important to get it right. We had a problem with this in the past when we created a script to draw arcs. If we used absolute altitudes the ends of the arcs ended up all at a fixed altitude instead of ground level. The eventual solution that we came up with was to use absolute altitudes and read the end point altitudes from Google’s Elevation API.

google earth blog KoreaReclaimedLand

Land reclamation near Seoul, South Korea, as seen in Aqua Monitor.

We have previously created animations of land reclamation and artificial islands being built. But we restricted ourselves to the time-frame visible in Google Earth historical imagery. Rather than the 30 years used in the above study. google earth blog riverknot

The post Land lost vs. land gained appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

13]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/land-lost-vs-land-gained.html/feed 1 18587http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.htmlhttp://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.html#respond Mon, 12 Sep 2016 11:27:40 +0000http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18571 We have done a number of posts in past years covering various aspects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent rebuilding of the World Trade Center, so today we will only be looking at some of the most recent changes. If you go to the site of the World Trade Center in Google Earth, […]

The post Remembering 9/11 with Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

14]]> We have done a number of posts in past years covering various aspects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent rebuilding of the World Trade Center, so today we will only be looking at some of the most recent changes.

If you go to the site of the World Trade Center in Google Earth, and turn off the 3D buildings layer.

2016. and shows 3 World Trade Center nearing completion. According to Wikipedia, the concrete core is now at its maximum height. We previously created a Street View slideshow showing the changes that have taken place over the years. We have updated it with the most recent imagery below.

google-earth-blog-wtc1

google-earth-blog-wtc1

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point. Oddly enough, this contradicts what it says on this page. Which states that Google Earth uses absolute altitudes for tours precisely because of the problems we are experiencing.

google earth blog WTC

Speed in milliseconds per image: World Trade Center 2 in the corner opposite the pools. And World Trade Center 5 on an adjacent block. See Wikipedia for more.

The post Remembering 9/11 with Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

15]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/remembering-911-google-earth-2.html/feed 0 18571http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/weird-altitude-effects-google-earth.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/weird-altitude-effects-google-earth.html#comments Fri, 09 Sep 2016 11:54:35 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18559 Yesterday we made some Google Earth tours of various US parks. We recorded the tours using Google Earth’s built in ‘Record a tour’ button on the tool bar. And then navigating with a SpaceNavigator 3D mouse. Everything seemed fine until we played back the tours and found that some of them have bumps in them […]

The post Weird altitude effects in Google Earth appeared first on Google Earth Blog. earthtopomaps.com

16]]> Yesterday we made some Google Earth tours of various US parks. We recorded the tours using Google Earth’s built in ‘Record a tour’ button on the tool bar and then navigating with a SpaceNavigator 3D mouse. Everything seemed fine until we played back the tours and found that some of them have bumps in them and occasionally some have quite severe up and down jitter. We found that these effects were actually part of the tours as they would occur in the same place when played again.

Thus Google Earth recorded the wrong altitudes when recording the tour. And when playing it back new altitude data is available. So it looks wrong. After much investigation. We do believe that is the main cause of the problem, but that there are other issues as well. google earth blog York Minster

We thought it would be interesting to try and fix the tours by using some maths to smooth out the altitudes. However. Smoothing them out may be difficult or impossible. Google Earth can store altitudes in two basic ways: relative to the ground (or sea floor). or an absolute measurement (from sea level). A third option is to leave out the altitudes and have objects automatically clamp to the ground level.

Because we cannot smooth them out without knowing what the ground altitude is at each point. Oddly enough, this contradicts what it says on this page. Which states that Google Earth uses absolute altitudes for tours precisely because of the problems we are experiencing.

As we noted in this post. when viewing areas with 3D, Google Earth shows the altitudes from the 3D imagery in the status bar. Or whether it uses the 3D imagery where available. What we found was surprising.

Typically. 3D imagery is above the default terrain, so intuitively one would expect relative altitudes to move upwards when you turn on. 3D imagery. What happens is the opposite. They move downwards. This is because.

The two scenes below illustrate what happens. In both cases we have some lines set to a fixed height relative to the ground:

17 August month-end post we mentioned that Monument Valley, Arizona / Utah was now in 3D in Google Earth. Several other US parks also received 3D imagery at the same time. What we didn’t realise at the time was the reason why. Google added 3D for several US parks at the end of August. It was because the US National Park Service celebrated its hundredth birthday on August 25, 2016. earthtopomaps.com

So, to show off the 3D imagery available for US Parks. Including both the new releases and areas that already had 3D (which we looked at last October). We have created some Google Earth tours, which you can view in Google Earth with this KML file. We have also recorded a select few of them in the YouTube video below:

Note that we haven’t created tours for every US park that has 3D. We have included outlines for the parks we know about that have 3D. If you notice we have missed any, please let us know in the comments.

For a map of all areas, not just US parks, that have 3D use this KML file.

The post US National Parks in 3D for centenary appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

18]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/us-national-parks-in-3d-for-centenary.html/feed 3 18544 7]]> http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/ships-google-earths-3d-imagery.html/feed 2 18629http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/worldview-4-skysat-launches.html http://www.gearthblog.com/blog/archives/2016/09/worldview-4-skysat-launches.html#comments Thu, 15 Sep 2016 11:14:57 +0000 http://www.gearthblog.com/?p=18614 The next couple of days will see two significant launches for satellite imaging.                                                       The post Ships in Google Earth’s 3D imagery appeared first on Google Earth Blog.

Crystal Serenity in Livorno, Italy.

If you are interested in collections of ships visible in 2D imagery, be sure to check out the Google Earth Community transport collections.

The post Ships in Google Earth’s 3D imagery appeared first on Google Earth Blog.                                                                                                       Which have a resolution of 3-5 m per pixel. It is also better resolution than the best imagery Google Earth currently has for some locations, so we hope Google considers using Terra Bella imagery to fill in the gaps in Google Earth.

Which have a resolution of 3-5 m per pixel. It is also better resolution than the best imagery Google Earth currently has for some locations, so we hope Google considers using Terra Bella imagery to fill in the gaps in Google Earth.                                                                                                               This is not as good as WorldView-4’s 30 cm per pixel, but is better than Planet Lab’s Dove satellites.                                                                                  Norwegian Pearl, in Miami (east coast of the US). earthtopomaps.com     

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Google Earth Blog Earth Topo Maps Overlay was originally published on Earthtopomaps

View College Basketball Shooting for three

view-college-basketball-091615statehoopsView College Basketball Shooting for three: Keeping up with the Madness

Also, teaming up with a few other March Madness enthusiasts. For all the times when I can’t be planted in front of my television watching the action. (or during those pesky commercial breaks). these tools will keep my head in the game!


View College Basketball Shooting for three: Keeping up with the Madness

 

View College Basketball

Therefore I’ve embarked on mythird.This My Map also shows you all the key locations for the Madness, color-coded for your viewing pleasure.consecutive. journey into mapping the NCAA College Basketball tournament. This may have caused a bit of personal March madness – a lot of long nights. And triple-checking each arena placemark – but I hope you’ll enjoy the result. I’ve made a Google Earth KMZ file that includes the home arenas of the field of 65, and the 14 tournament venues. Each entry in the field of 65 is color coded by region and the game sites have a special basketball icon this year.Also, teaming up with a few other March Madness enthusiasts, we’ve created a page,google.com/collegebasketball2010, where all of you basketball fans can find additional Google tools to help you track the tournament.You can also see real time search results so you never miss any March Madnessnews or chatter.

View College Basketball You may wonder why I’ve kept this up for three years  well, aside from the fundamental fact that I’m a college hoops nut. Where all of you basketball fans can find additional Google tools to help you track the tournament. View College Basketball I just so happen to also love seeing the geo-spatial distribution of the teams. The research and compliation of the information led me to several interesting facts you can see for yourself in the layer and then use to wow your friends, such as:.Today, the wonderful chaos that is March Madness returns, and with it, comes abrand new college basketball KML like the one I built last year.

  • There are two first-round matchups that pit two teams which have the same mascots
  • Bears, Eagles, Gophers, Grizzlies, and Lions have a common trait: they are all ‘Golden’
  • This year’s tournament is quite colorful: Blue Devils, Mean Green, Orangemen, Big Red, and Yellow Jackets

 View College Basketball this My Map also shows you all the key locations for the Madness. Color-coded for your viewing pleasure. The East division is indicated by a blue pin; South with green; Midwest with red; and West with cyan. The pins with a dot in the center tell you who the #1 seeds are:

Mapping the Madness returns

March 19, 2009
Today, the wonderful chaos that is March Madness returns, and with it, comes abrand new college basketball KML like the one I built last year. To celebrate this annual moment of basketball bliss, I’ve added the locations of this year’s 13 tournament venues. In addition to the locations of the 65 tournament teams’ campuses.Why, you might ask, did I decide to burn the midnight oil again to map these locations? Because I’m a a die-hard college hoops nut, plain and simple. As you’re watching the games over the next few weeks, take a minute during a break in the action to do some March Madness geo-browsing and see if you can find these spots in Google Earth:
  • A tournament venue with an airplane silhouette on top of it
  • The tournament team based in Moon Township, PA
  • The two tournament teams that play in arenas that have their school logos on the roofs

I’ve also included these placemarks on a My Map – check it out:

Tournament 2010 in a larger map earthtopomaps.com


Also, teaming up with a few other March Madness enthusiasts, we’ve created a page google.com/collegebasketball2010 View College Basketball Where all of you basketball fans can find additional Google tools to help you track the tournament. Travel to the tournament without leaving home! All 14 arenas are in the “3D Buildings” layer in Google Earth. Ready for you to explore. Take a tour of these 3D models by watching the video below or download this kml tour and open it in Google Earth 5 Google Earth KMZ file. Be sure to check out the Energy Solutions Arena in Salt Lake City — even the court is modeled.



 
Also, teaming up with a few other March Madness enthusiasts.  We’ve created a page google.com/collegebasketball2010 Where all of you basketball fans can find additional Google tools to help you track the tournament. Keep up with your favorite teams and get up-to-date information on scores, schedules, and brackets with our iGoogle gadgetBy doing a quick search for your favorite team  you can see
live scores.. If you haven’t already made a bracket. Check out our Google docs tournament.bracket template to help you create and manage your pool in an online spreadsheet you can also see real time search results so you never miss any March Madness news or chatter! Google Earth KMZ file

For all the times when I can’t be planted in front of my television watching the action. (or during those pesky commercial breaks). these tools will keep my head in the game!

View College Basketball Shooting for three was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Google Earth Video Enjoying opening day

Google Earth video

 

Google Earth Video Enjoying opening day with Google tools

And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season.

b) Google Earth Video April 5, 2012 

And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season.
Spring is finally here and with it Google Earth Video the beginning of the 2012 baseball season!.

c) Google Earth video Now that you’ve got your jacket packed, where to go pre-game for a light snack? .This means the beginning of another fabulous year of Cracker Jacks and days at the ballpark. To celebrate the start of the 2012 season of America’s pastime. We’ve created a special  Featuring aerial imagery and 3D models of the country’s most legendary stadiums. Fly to Fenway in Boston.And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season. Soar over Chicago’s Wrigley Field and check out San Francisco Bay and AT&T Park. All from a bird’s eye view. What a way to take a virtual journey with your team as they travel across the country!. Spring is finally here and with it Google Earth Video.

Google Earth Video And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season. 
And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season.

For the lucky fans that get to attend their favorite team’s games in person, we’ve put together a few tips to make the most of each match-up. Batter up!

 

 

Google Earth video Weather layerNow that you’ve got your jacket packed, where to go pre-game for a light snack? .
And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season.

Scope out the area around the ballpark with Street View in Google Maps to pick a spot to meet up before finding your seats (and maybe a couple of hot dogs along the way). 

Google Earth video search nearby
Scope out the area around the ballpark with Street View in Google Maps to pick a spot to meet up before finding your seats (and maybe a couple of hot dogs along the way). 
And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season.

 

Google Earth video ATT Park

Street View of At&T Park in San Francisco


And family and add text, videos and photos to create an archive of your travels to enjoy during the off-season. 

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Google Earth Video Enjoying opening day was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Vertical Street View world’s most iconic rock wall

Vertical Street View of the world’s most iconic rock wall: Yosemite’s El Capitan. earthtopomaps.comVertical Street View Screen Shot at

Vertical Street View June 24, 2015

Today we’re launching our first-ever vertical Street View collection. Giving you the opportunity to climb 3,000 feet up the world’s most famous rock wall: Yosemite’s El Capitan. Vertical Street View To bring you this new imagery, we partnered with legendary climbers Lynn Hill. Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell. Read more about the project from Tommy Caldwell, who completed the world’s hardest climb in Yosemite in January of 2015. -Ed.

“That is awesome. I definitely have to be a part of that.”.

Maybe it was the sheer exhaustion from being in the middle of a 19-day climb of the Dawn Wall. But when the guys at Google Maps and Yosemite National Parkasked if I wanted to help them with their first-ever vertical Street View collection of El Capitan in Yosemite. I didn’t hesitate. Yosemite has been such an important part of my life that telling the story of El Capitan through Street View was right up my alley—especially when it meant working with the Google engineers to figure out some absurd challenges.

Hear the legendary Lynn Hill explain describe the gear she uses as she starts up El Cap. earthtopomaps.com These 360-degree panoramic images are the closest thing I’ve ever witnessed to actually being thousands of feet up a vertical rock face.—better than any video or photo. But my hope is that this new imagery will inspire you to get out there and see Yosemite for yourself… whether you travel up a rock wall or just down the trail.
Climbing is all about flirting with the impossible and pushing the boundaries of what you think you can be done. Capturing Street View imagery 3,000 feet up El Capitan proved to be an extension of that, especially when you take a camera meant for the inside of a restaurant and mount it thousands of feet up the world’s most iconic rock wall.
Vertical Street View Alex King Swing
Brett Lowell and Corey Rich capturing Street View of Alex Honnold on the King Swing.
Doing anything thousands of feet high on a sheer granite face is complicated. But everyone up there had spent years of their lives on a rope and knew exactly what they were doing. After some testing. We used our tried-and-true climbing gear like cams and ropes to make sure the camera wouldn’t fall to the ground in the middle of our Street View collection.

Once we figured out how to keep the camera on El Cap, we created two sets of vertical Street View.

Vertical Street View EL CAP TOWERFINAL GIF v mb
Lynn Hill, Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell camp out 1,140 feet up El Capitan.
Lynn Hill’s ascent of El Capitan changed the paradigm of climbing. And she had an extraordinary effect on my climbing career. I’ll never forget when she became the first person. Man or woman, to free-climb (using only her hands and feet)“The Nose” back in 1993. Now, you can see her navigate these epic moves.— like climbing sideways on tiny holds of the Jardine Traverse, inventing a “Houdini” maneuver on the Changing Corners and traversing under the Great Roof. Vertical Street View.
Vertical Street View Screen Shot at
Lynn’s epic ascent up El Cap is now in Street View.
Any story of El Capitan had to include my good friend Alex Honnold. He holds the speed record for climbing the Nose at 2 hours. And 23 minutes – most people take 3-5 days. His unwavering confidence in himself is contagious; when. I’m with him, I feel like the mountain has shrunk to half its size. As you make your way around Yosemite in Street View, you’ll see Alex doing what he does best:. chimneying up the “Texas Flake.” racing up the bolt ladder. Or getting dinner ready in the solar-powered van he calls home. earthtopomaps.com  But years of setting ropes proved pretty helpful in figuring out how to get the equipment rigged and ready to collect Street View.
Just a normal day on on the Texas Flake for Alex Honnold.
You’ll also see a glimpse of yours truly on the Dawn Wall. I spent some of my rest days during my January climb of the Dawn Wall testing out the Street View technology the Google team had sent me that month. El Cap is an intimidating environment for experimentation. But years of setting ropes proved pretty helpful in figuring out how to get the equipment rigged and ready to collect Street View. earthtopomaps.com
Vertical Street View Screen Shot at
Tommy Caldwell climbing the sheer face of the Dawn Wall.
Then, we really put Alex to work to collect the second set of Street View: the entire vertical route of “The Nose” on El Capitan. One of the few people that could do this efficiently and quickly. Alex took the camera and pretty much ran 3,000 feet up with photographer partner Brett Lowell. Now, anyone can get the beta (climbing speak for insider advice) before they climb the entire route. Vertical Street View. Then, we really put Alex to work to collect the second set of Street View: the entire vertical route of “The Nose” on El Capitan. You’ll also see a glimpse of yours truly on the Dawn Wall.
Alex Honnold and Brett Lowell climbed 3,000 feet to get the entire route in Google Maps.
Yosemite when Google brings students to the park through NatureBridge later this year as a part of this project. Lynn, Alex and I also helped create a new Yosemite Treks page. Where you can take a tour up El Cap and learn more about climbing, from what a “hand jam” is to why we wear such tiny shoes. And as a father. I’m excited kids will learn more about. Yosemite when Google brings students to the park through NatureBridge later this year as a part of this project. Plus, its pretty awesome that students who can’t make it to Yosemite yet will be go on a virtual reality field trip to the Park with Google Expeditions. Lynn, Alex and I also helped create a new Yosemite Treks page. Yosemite’s driven so much of my life that I’m excited to be able to share it with the world through my eyes.
Vertical Street View Screen Shot at
Hear the legendary Lynn Hill explain describe the gear she uses as she starts up El Cap. earthtopomaps.com These 360-degree panoramic images are the closest thing I’ve ever witnessed to actually being thousands of feet up a vertical rock face.—better than any video or photo. But my hope is that this new imagery will inspire you to get out there and see Yosemite for yourself… whether you travel up a rock wall or just down the trail.
Tommy Caldwell, Lynn Hill, and Alex Honnold hanging out in Yosemite Hear the legendary Lynn Hill explain describe the gear she uses as she starts up El Cap. earthtopomaps.com These 360-degree panoramic images are the closest thing I’ve ever witnessed to actually being thousands of feet up a vertical rock face.—better than any video or photo. But my hope is that this new imagery will inspire you to get out there and see Yosemite for yourself… whether you travel up a rock wall or just down the trail.

Vertical Street View world’s most iconic rock wall was originally published on Earthtopomaps

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