Google Maps Everest

A)Google Maps Everest

B)Google Maps Everest Growing up in the shadow of Everest

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/XGSIU39Y7WU?rel=0&controls=0&showinfo=0

Date Google Maps Everest March 12, 2015.                                                                        google maps everest

C)Fantastic Google Maps Everest Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009, Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational and economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle, embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps. -Ed.                                    google maps everest

I was born in 1960 in Thame, a small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak. Google Maps Everest Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30, a dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter. Google Maps Everest.

 google maps everest

Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation.


Our region is famous for being home to Everest, but it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year, I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse. Google Maps Everest.

 google maps everest
Phortse Thakiri Chholing Gomba, Monastery, Nepal


Partnering with Google Maps Google Maps Everest allowed us to get important local landmarks on the map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world, including local monasteries, lodges, schools and more, with some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online, they’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there.
Phortse, Khumbu Region, Nepal


 google maps everest
Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]


When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest, I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better, safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering.
Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person, come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa

March 12, 2015

Apa Sherpa is a Sherpa mountaineer who holds the world record for reaching the summit of Mount Everest 21 times—more than any other person. In 2009. Apa founded the Apa Sherpa Foundation, a nonprofit that works to provide better educational. And economic opportunities to the young people of the Khumbu region. In March 2014, Apa Sherpa, Google Earth Outreach, and the Nepalese nonprofit Story Cycle. Embarked on a 10-day trek through the Khumbu region, supporting local people to enhance the digital representations of their communities on Google Maps Everest. We hope the project will empower the Apa Sherpa Foundation, Story Cycle, other nonprofits, and Sherpa community members to tell their stories through Google Maps Everest. -Ed.
I was born in 1960 in Thame. A small town in the Khumbu region of Nepal, which is home to Mount Everest. The world’s tallest peak. Even though I grew up in the shadow of the mountain, I dreamt of being a doctor instead of a climber. That dream was never realized. When I was 12, my father passed away, and I had to find work to support my family. So I began carrying goods up the mountain as part of an expedition team. At 30. A dream that had never been mine came true: I summited Everest for the first time as a porter.
Apa Sherpa on the summit of Everest with a memorial to Sir Edmund Hillary who passed away in 2008. Photo credit: Apa Sherpa Foundation


Our region is famous for being home to Everest. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain. So last year. I guided the Google Maps team through my home region to collect Street View imagery that improves the map of our community. Now you can find Thame on the map and explore other communities nestled at the base of Everest, like Khumjung and Phortse.

Phortse Thakiri Chholing Gomba, Monastery, Nepal In my hometown to give children other options for their future. So they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.

Partnering with Google Maps allowed us to get important local landmarks on . The map and share a richer view of Khumbu with the world. Including local monasteries, lodges. schools and more. With some yaks along the way! My hope is that when people see this imagery online. They’ll have a deeper understanding of the region and the Sherpa people that live there.

Phortse, Khumbu Region, Nepal

When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing.

Map of Thame, Apa Sherpa’s hometown, before the Google Mapping project [above] and added locations [below]


When people ask what it feels like to reach the top of Mount Everest. I say “heaven.” But I haven’t summited the mountain 21 times because I love climbing. I earned this world record in pursuit of a greater goal: to provide a good education and a better. Safer life for my kids. My hope is that my children and future generations have many choices for employment outside of mountaineering. Through the Apa Sherpa Foundation, I now work to improve educational access by funding the Lower Secondary School. In my hometown to give children other options for their future, so they can pursue their dreams to be doctors—. Or anything else they want to be, like mine, so many years ago. Your online trip to my home awaits you on Google Maps Everest. And if you ever get the chance to visit the Khumbu region in person. Come stay at the Everest Summiteer Lodge that I built with my own hands. We’ll be ready to welcome you.  But it’s also the home of the Sherpa community and has been for centuries. The region has much more to offer than just the mountain.


Namaste,

Apa Sherpa               earthtopomaps

Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

Keeping Earth up to date and looking great

June 27, 2016

Keeping Earth. Three years ago we introduced a cloud-free mosaic of the world in Google Earth. Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Columbia Glacier, Alaska To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Detroit, Michigan  To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. Keeping Earth Screen Shot at

Swiss Alps, Switzerland   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.  More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. Keeping Earth thumb

Higher Quality Imagery We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s more than 700 trillion individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth thumb

Landsat 8, which launched into orbit in 2013, is the newest sensor in the USGS/NASA Landsat Program—superior to its predecessors in many ways. Landsat 8 captures images with greater detail, truer colors, and at an unprecedented frequency—capturing twice as many images as Landsat 7 does every day. This new rendition of Earth uses the most recent data available — mostly from Landsat 8 — making it our freshest global mosaic to date. Keeping Earth Screen Shot atIn the new view of New York City, details like skyscrapers, building shadows, and baseball and softball fields in Central Park shine through.   Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.Keeping Earth Screen Shot atToday we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Keeping Earth Screen Shot atJuly 9, 2000  Today we’re rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from.  Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before.

September 20, 2003

Processing imagery with Earth Engine. But not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images. And took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image. 

 

 To produce this new imagery. We used the same publicly available. Earth Engine APIs that scientists use to do things like track global tree cover, loss, and gain; predict Malaria outbreaks; and map global surface water over a 30 year period.

Like our previous mosaic. We mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagery—that’s. More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels. To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe. Keeping Earth.

Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan

Brasilia, Brazil More than 700 trillion. individual pixels—to choose the best cloud-free pixels.

Open data is good for everyone To put that in perspective. 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe.

Landsat program and its commitment to free and accessible open data. Landsat, a joint program of the USGS and NASA. Has observed the Earth continuously from 1972 to the present day. And offers a wealth of information on the changes to the Earth’s surface over time. And it’s all available in Earth Engine!

 

The new imagery is now available across all our mapping products. To check it out, open up Google Earth, or turn on the satellite layer in Google Maps. Keeping Earth.

Post authored by: Chris Herwig, Program Manager, Google Earth Engine. Keeping Earth earthtopomaps.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

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Keeping Earth up to date and looking great was originally published on Earthtopomaps

Google Mapping Only clear skies on Google Maps

Google Mapping Only clear skies on Google Maps and Earth

June 26, 2016
To celebrate the sunny days of summer (in the northern hemisphere at least). We’re unveiling new satellite imagery for all Google mapping products today. This stunning new imagery of the earth from space virtually eliminates clouds, includes refreshed imagery for regions of the world where high-resolution imagery is not yet available. And offers a more comprehensive and accurate view of the texture of our planet’s landscape. Google mapping 2

The new, even more beautiful global view in Maps and Earth.

In 2002 NASA released the Blue Marble, a global image of the earth with a resolution of one kilometer per pixel, based on data from NASA’s MODIS instrument. Updated in 2005 to twice the resolution, it has remained the canonical globally-uniform picture of the earth for over a decade.

With the Blue Marble as inspiration, we used Google Earth Engine technology to mine hundreds of terabytes of data from the USGS’s and NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite. The result is a seamless, globally-consistent image of the entire planet with a resolution of 15 meters per pixel, far finer than is possible with MODIS data alone.

To get a feel for the difference, here’s a comparison of the Grand Canyon, first from the Blue Marble Next Generation (courtesy NASA’s Earth Observatory), and then in our new Landsat-based imagery.Google mapping

The Grand Canyon, as seen by MODIS and by Landsat 7.

The Landsat 7 satellite suffered a hardware failure early in its life that introduced striped artifacts into all of its images. By analyzing a large number of images we were able to virtually eliminate these stripes, as well as clouds and other atmospheric effects. The process was very similar to how we produced theglobal time-lapse imagery of the earth that we released last month. Google mapping castellon

Castellón, Spain: One example Landsat 7 image, and the final combined image.

The resulting 800,000 megapixel global image is so big that if you wanted to print it at a standard resolution of 300 dots per inch. You would need a piece of paper the size of a city block! Google mappingGoogle mapping south america

Northwestern South America: before and after.

Mining data from a large number of Landsat images of each area allowed. Us to reconstruct cloud-free imagery even in tropical regions that are always at least partly cloudy. Google mapping papua

Central Papua, Indonesia: before and after.

We prioritized recent data when it was available. So this update also includes refreshed imagery in many regions of the world. Especially in areas where high-resolution imagery is not available. Including parts of Russia, Indonesia, and central Africa. Google mappingGoogle mapping saudi arabia

Agricultural expansion in Saudi Arabia: before and after.

This new picture of the earth also reveals the texture of the landscape with greater clarity than ever before. Google mapping brazil deforestation

Continuing deforestation in Brazil: before and after. Google mapping

We’re proud of the progress we have made, but there is always room to keep improving. For example, although we have tried to minimize the impact of the stripe artifacts in the Landsat 7 images. They are still visible in some areas. There is more good news though: the new Landsat 8 satellite. Launched earlier this year, promises to capture even more beautiful and up-to-date imagery in the months and years ahead.
Google mapping mongolia

Mongolia and surrounds, before and after. Google mapping

You can see our new satellite imagery by going to Google Maps and turning on satellite view. Or by launching Google Earth. And zooming out. Have fun exploring!                                                                                                                                                    

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Google Mapping Only clear skies on Google Maps was originally published on Earthtopomaps

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